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English

The English Department aims to help students develop reading and writing skills, and to foster a love of reading and the discussions that follow. Through the engaging complexities of literature, students continually grapple with ideas that recall us to our common humanity.

Our standard course sequence is: English 9; English 10; English 11; and English 12. By invitation based on teacher recommendation and ACT scores, qualified students may opt for our challenging honors program. Students who demonstrate proficiency are encouraged to take an exam in Advanced Placement English in the junior and senior year.

While we appreciate the role of technology in teaching and learning, we promote intentional uses of technology only when it improves student learning.

The mastery of English skills happens both in class and in moments of one-on-one work; thus, teachers work closely with students inside and outside of class hours. We believe that the foundation of responsible global citizenship resides in an individual’s ability to read analytically and communicate effectively in writing and speech.

Available Courses

English 9: The Individual

(1.0 Credit)

The Individual is a full year course. Students will focus on essential reading and writing skills, such as paragraph structure, sentence structure, annotation and reading comprehension skills. Students will read six texts, many focusing on bildungsromans-- coming of age novels. Writing work will include creative writing, formal analytical writing, and expository writing. Grading will be based on daily reading quizzes, major and minor writing assignments, vocabulary work, grammar quizzes, and tests assessing student understanding of key skills. Semester and final exams will assess all skills learned thus far. The course is founded on the essential question: Who am I? Accompanying essential questions include: What does it mean to be human? What is my relationship and responsibility to others? Focus will be placed on the self in relationship to the community. These questions will act as the backbone for all class discussions and writing assignments. There is no pre-requisite for this course.

English 9 Honors: The Individual

1.0 credit

The Individual is a full year course. Students will focus on essential reading and writing skills, such as paragraph structure, sentence structure, annotation and reading comprehension skills. Students will read six texts, many focusing on bildungsromans-- coming of age novels. Writing work will include creative writing, formal analytical writing, and expository writing. Grading will be based on daily reading quizzes, major and minor writing assignments, vocabulary work, grammar quizzes, and tests assessing student understanding of key skills. Semester and final exams will assess all skills learned thus far. The course is founded on the essential question: Who am I? Accompanying essential questions include: What does it mean to be human? What is my relationship and responsibility to others? Focus will be placed on the self in relationship to the community. These questions will act as the backbone for all class discussions and writing assignments. The primary difference between English 9 and Honors English 9 lies in the pacing and complexity of reading and writing assignments. Prerequisites for this course include high ACT scores and a recommendation from past English teachers.

English 10 International: Individual and Community

1.0 credit

International: The Individual and the Community spans an entire school year. Students are expected to build upon previous foundational instruction as they incorporate more advanced literary analysis and thesis development within their written and oral discussion. Assessment inside the classroom will be conducted using traditional methods such as major and minor essays, quizzes and tests, reflections, and presentations. Remotely, online assessment of student work will occur regularly - most often utilizing the school’s digital learning platform, Haiku.

Just as the skills and learning objectives of this class build upon those developed in the previous year, so does its theme. Class members will re-examine their concept of self, now as it exists as a part of a greater whole. The concept of a community will be considered on many levels – including family, school, and as a residential grouping. Certainly, this exploration will suggest a number of essential questions: Who am I, and what is my relationship to my various communities? What responsibility do I have with respect to each community? What are my personal perspectives on community, including my family and my school?

This class is an option for international students whose first language is other than English. The novels that are chosen, class pacing, specific grammar and vocabulary focus are purposeful and delivered with international students in mind.

English 10: The Individual and Community

1.0 credits

The Individual and Community spans an entire school year. Students are expected to build upon previous foundational instruction as they incorporate more advanced literary analysis and thesis development within their written and oral discussion. Assessment inside the classroom will be conducted using traditional methods such as major and minor essays, quizzes and tests, reflections, and presentations. Remotely, online assessment of student work will occur regularly - most often utilizing the school’s digital learning platform, PowerSchool.

Just as the skills and learning objectives of this class build upon those developed in the previous year, so does its theme. Class members will re-examine their concept of self, now as it exists as a part of a greater whole. The concept of a community will be considered on many levels – including family, school, and as a residential grouping. Certainly, this exploration will suggest a number of essential questions: Who am I, and what is my relationship to my various communities? What responsibility do I have with respect to each community? What are my personal perspectives on community, including my family and my school?

English 10: Individual and Community Honors

1.0 credit

The Individual and Community spans an entire school year. Students are expected to build upon previous foundational instruction as they incorporate more advanced literary analysis and thesis development within their written and oral discussion. Assessment inside the classroom will be conducted using traditional methods such as major and minor essays, quizzes and tests, reflections, and presentations. Remotely, online assessment of student work will occur regularly - most often utilizing the school’s digital learning platform, PowerSchool.

Just as the skills and learning objectives of this app class build upon those developed in the previous year, so does its theme. Class members will re-examine their concept of self, now as it exists as a part of a greater whole. The concept of a community will be considered on many levels – including family, school, and as a residential grouping. Certainly, this exploration will suggest a number of essential questions: Who am I, and what is my relationship to my various communities? What responsibility do I have with respect to each community? What are my personal perspectives on community, including my family and my school?

English 11: The Individual and Society

1.0 credit

The Individual and Society is a yearlong course. Students will focus on reading comprehension as they analyze a variety of complex texts. Students will respond to the texts in diverse ways, including formal analytical essays, creative projects, poetry, film, and artistic responses. Continued work on paragraph structure will include ways in which a student might seamlessly infuse argument, evidence, and analysis into his or her writing. Students will read 6-10 texts. Grading will be based on daily reading quizzes, major and minor writing assignments, class discussions, and projects assessing student understanding of key skills. Semester and final exams will assess all skills learned thus far. Essential questions for the course include: Who am I and what is my relationship and responsibility to society? To what social communities do individuals belong, and how do those communities influence their existence? What does it mean to be an individual amidst varying social constructs and cultures? These questions will act as the backbone for all class discussions and writing assignments.

English 11 Honors: AP Language and Composition

1.0 credit

AP Language and Composition is a yearlong course. Students will focus on reading comprehension and written textual response as they tackle a variety of complex texts, as well as the rhetorical skills that come with analysis of such texts. Students will respond to the texts in diverse ways, including formal analytical essays, creative projects, poetry, film, and artistic responses. Continued work on paragraph and essay structure will include ways in which a student might seamlessly infuse argument, evidence, and analysis into his or her writing. Analyzing the complexity of language will be a primary focus both in class and at home. Grading will be based on daily reading quizzes, major and minor writing assignments, and tests assessing student understanding of key skills. Semester and final exams will assess all skills learned thus far. The course is founded on the essential question: Who am I and what is my relationship and responsibility to society? To what social communities do individuals belong, and how do those communities influence their existence? What does it mean to be an individual amidst potentially warping social constructions of morality, justice, race-relations, etc.? These questions will act as the backbone for all class discussions and writing assignments. The syllabus will include an emphasis on non-fiction texts. Students must be recommended for this course. Students will be required to take the A.P. Language and Composition exam at the end of the year.

Digital Journalism

0.5 credits or 1.0 credits

Digital Journalism is a semester course with a focus on building a digital portfolio and resume as well as giving students practical experience through the production and editing of various digital material. The course will begin with the study of the shift from print to digital media and concepts of media ethics, design, and business will be applied throughout the course. The course is taught in a newsroom setting, where students will work in partnership to create digital content both in the classroom and throughout campus. High-level student work will be featured on the HPA website, as well as in social media. The class will include discussions on emerging media themes, the importance of Web analytics, and the impact of social media on the news stream and mainstream media. A portion of the course will focus on creating not only a digital portfolio, but also digital literacy and citizenship. Guest speakers both in the digital media industry, as well as in academics, will present on trends in digital journalism and working in the field.

English 12 Capstone: Food Literature

1.0 credits

Food Literature is an experiential, year-long course where students will consider food as a topic in literary works from different genres and periods as well as explore connections between food practices, culture, philosophical beliefs, and behavior with an emphasis on food practices and systems in Hawaii. This class will develop skills of literary interpretation relevant to advanced work in English, such as literary analysis and research. Students will also engage in many projects, including creating videos, cooking food, and participating in community-based activities. Essential questions for the course include: If you are what you eat, then what are you? How does food influence our deeply held beliefs and daily behavior? How do our food choices affect our personal health and the health of our environment? How do our food philosophies and identities influence food policies at various levels? These questions will act as the backbone for all class discussions and writing assignments. Students will also propose, plan, research, and execute a year-long independent capstone project and present it at the HPA Exhibition day in May.

English 12: The Global Individual

1.0 credits

is a yearlong course. Students will sharpen and perfect the breadth of skills and techniques they have acquired throughout their college preparatory years. Foremost among these include literary analysis, composition, and oral presentation. Every effort has been made to select source literature that represents the core genre of literature: poetry, prose, drama, nonfiction, and media. Furthermore, the works selected exemplify a wide variety of categories, including humor, horror, tragedy, and satire.

Coursework will explore the following guiding questions: What does it mean to be an individual in a global context? How do my actions and values fit into the larger community of the world and humankind? Through a consistent return to these questions throughout the year, students will push themselves beyond an exploration of the individual and into the larger scope of becoming global citizens.

English 12 Honors

1.0 credits

English 12 Honors is a yearlong course. Students will sharpen and perfect the breadth of skills and techniques they have acquired throughout their college preparatory years. Foremost among these include literary analysis, composition, and oral presentation. Every effort has been made to select source literature that represents the core genre of literature: poetry, prose, drama, nonfiction, and media. Furthermore, the works selected exemplify a wide variety of categories, including humor, horror, tragedy, and satire.

As an upper level course, English 12 Honors assesses participants at a very high standard. Grading will be based on daily reading quizzes, major and minor writing assignments, and tests assessing student understanding of key skills. Semester and final exams will assess all skills learned thus far. Students must be recommended for this course. Students may take the A.P. Literature exam at the end of the year, and should feel fully prepared for the exam after completing this course.

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